Migrating to BunnyCDN

When I first deployed my website, I opted to deploy an OpenLightSpeed WordPress instance using the one-click installer from Linode. The one-click install setup the OpenLiteSpeed webserver including the LSPHP cacheing API as well as the LSCache plugin. Together the trio of applications work together to serve PHP content over port 80/443 as fast as possible. One of the great things about the one-click installer is their equally polished integration into the QUIC.Cloud Content Delivery Network. While I am leaving the QUIC.Cloud CDN for my personal website, I would continue to recommend them for WordPress based websites. I have no hard feelings; they simply did not have the integration I wanted to utilize in 2024.

Method of Procedure

The implementation process with BunnyNet should be rather simple. I need to update my HTML and CSS templating to utilize my BunnyNet Pull Zone instead of locally hosted assets. This is entirely done in VSCode and tested locally on my machine using JekyllRB. Once I am satisfied with the final build I can begin the following processes.

  • Create a BunnyNet Pull Zone.
  • Remove old CNAME record pointing to QUIC.Cloud.
  • Purge and Disable the QUIC.Cloud CDN network.
  • Create new CNAME record pointing to my BunnyNet Pull Zone.
  • Enable Verification of Origin webserver SSL certificate.
  • Enforce Network Limits within the Pull Zone.
  • Block ‘dangerous’ countries at the CDN level.
  • Push updated site build with BunnyNet served assets into the origin webserver.

DNS propogation will take approximately 48 hours to complete around the globe.

Rational

During my time using the QUIC.Cloud Content Delivery Network, I was perfectly happy with the performance. However when I decided to take my HTML learning journey a step further I encountered issues with Cache hit-rate. This is probably because QUIC.Cloud relies heavily on LSPHP and LSCache integrations which my site no longer has available. Going into 2024 I’ve given myself a goal of 99.99% uptime. Implying I can only tolerate 52.6 minutes of downtime. To reduce the likelyhood of an outage, I really need a strong CDN with a high cache hit-rate sitting in front of my server.

2024

Matts Auto Support

Hello and welcome to 2024! I hope all of my readers are doing well. We had a fantatsic Christmas Holiday with the family and did a bit of travelling. Today I...

Back to top ↑

2023

Experience OpenLiteSpeed

Howdy Friends! Today I will be tuning the underlying webserver that is running this very WordPress application. My hope is to reduce overall CPU load as well...

Mom Said Redefine Success

In High School I had one dream that stands out. Own a Porsche by the time I was 26. Looking back, I have no idea where this dream came from; because I was ra...

Jellyfin Guide for Friends and Family

Hello and welcome friends and family! I am glad that you have taken interest in my Jellyfin server or another of my home lab adventures. Below you will find ...

Back to top ↑

2022

Back to top ↑

2021

Back to top ↑